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Ghosts of New York Blog 15 Boss Bill Tweed, the Spoilsman of Patronage

Ghosts of New York Blog 15 Boss Bill Tweed, the Spoilsman of Patronage © 2018 by Dr. Philip Ernest Schoenberg, Ghost with a Blog William “Boss” Tweed is a ghost that cannot go away. The Old New York County Courthouse at 52 Chambers Street renamed the Tweed Gallery and then renamed the Tweed Education Building,…

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Mayor Fiorello La Guardia

NYC Walks Blog 14 Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, NYC’s Greatest of the Twentieth Century Mayor  © 2018 by Dr. Philip Ernest Schoenberg #ghost New York’s most famous mayor was Henry Enrico Farewell La Giardia (1882-1947). He was the son of an Austrian Jewish mother and an Italian agnostic father, born at 177 Sullivan Street in…

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The Origins of Labor Day

NYC Walks Blog 13 The Origins of Labor Day © 2018 by Dr. Philip Ernest Schoenberg #ghost The concept that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take place were outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of…

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Henry Hudson Claimed New York Harbor for the Dutch

NYC Walks Blog 12 Henry Hudson Claimed New York Harbor for the Dutch © 2018 by Dr. Philip Ernest Schoenberg #ghost   In 1609, two years after English settlers established the colony of Jamestown in Virginia, the Dutch East India Company hired English sailor Henry Hudson to find a northeast passage to India. After unsuccessfully…

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Lincoln’s New York

When  Abraham Lincoln visited New York City for the first time in 1857, the new in New York City was really new.  Our city was on the cutting edge of technological innovation, cultural novelty, educational change, financial modernization, transportation leadership, communication pacesetting, commercial pioneering, and cultural trailblazing.  For Lincoln, New York was the future, where…

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Henry Hudson Claimed New York Harbor for the Dutch

NYC Blog 12 Henry Hudson Claimed New York Harbor for the Dutch © 2017 by Dr. Philip Ernest Schoenberg #ghost   In 1609, two years after English settlers established the colony of Jamestown in Virginia, the Dutch East India Company hired English sailor Henry Hudson to find a northeast passage to India.  After unsuccessfully searching…

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The Amazing Bridge

It took thirteen years (1870-1883) to build instead of the promised three; compared to six years it took to build the Transcontinental Railroad (1863-1689). Or the nine years it took Keith Godard to put up the plaques. $15,000,000 instead of the estimated $7,000,000. In today’s money, the Brooklyn Bridge cost more than $1,500,000,000 to build….

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Frank Farrington and the First Cable across the Bridge

Once the towers were in place, cabling the bridge became a major event. All river traffic stopped. Huge crowds watched as the workers labored to connect the cables across the East River. On August 14, 1876, the first slender wire was strung from tower to tower. The headline in the Brooklyn Eagle proclaimed: “Wedded!” while…

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Washington and Emily Roebling

Fortunately, his son, Washington Augustus Roebling, was determined not only to follow his father’s plans but was flexible enough to modify them as unanticipated problems occurred. And in turn, he had the support and the partnership of his wife Emily Warren Roebling. Together they were able to finish one of the most ambitious architectural feats…

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The Brooklyn Bridge: The Eighth Wonder of the World

Scott Fitzgerald called Manhattan Island the “fresh, green breast of the New World” that greeted the sailors on Hudson’s Half Moon. The colonists wasted no time in proceeding with an aggressive program of land-clearing and filling. The Brooklyn Bridge IS New York City. More than the Statue of Liberty, which we have to share with…

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